I am Tom Freeland, a lawyer in Oxford, Mississippi. The picture in the header is my law office. I'm on Twitter as NMissC

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BlogRoll

Gary Wills on Robert Caro’s latest volume on LBJ

Wills has a really great review of Caro’s latest that focuses on one of the big themes of the book, the hatred between Johnson and Bobby Kennedy.   One of the interesting things in Caro’s book is that he at least rhetorically rides the fence on two big historical questions:  Did John Kennedy really back almost [...]

A note from Faulkner’s Sanctuary, and recent reading

William Faulkner famously wrote Sanctuary and used the advance to buy the house in which he moved with his just-married wife Estelle, who had been divorced from her first husband.

Here’s how he has one of his characters describe marrying someone who’d been previously married:

When you marry your own wife, you start off [...]

Quote for the day

On C-Span, talking about his new book, Robert Caro just asked, “Am I going on too long here?”

Lyndon Johnson demands a quid pro quo from the Houston Chronicle

Once Lyndon Johnson became president, a remarkable historical resource became available:  His recording of all his phone calls at the White House and at his ranch.  This allows Robert Caro to describe with an extraordinary vividness events from early December of 1963 on.

One remarkable example of Johnson hardball had to do with his [...]

Gary Wills reviews Robert Caro’s latest volume in his Lyndon Johnson biography

Update:  I forgot to add this detail:  Square Books in Oxford has signed copies of Caro’s book, Passage to Power.

It is often odd to read a review while one is in the middle of reading the book under review, and Garry Wills’s review of Robert Caro’s new installment in his never-ending biography of [...]

Robert Caro writes about November 22, 1963

Robert Caro’s account (New Yorker subscription required) of the day Kennedy was shot, from Lyndon Johnson’s perspective, is an amazing and vivid piece of writing.  It’s a moment-by-moment account, and both carries the reader along with great intensity and describes the crisis lived through by people in the presidential entourage that day.

It’s in the April [...]