I am Tom Freeland, a lawyer in Oxford, Mississippi. The picture in the header is my law office. I'm on Twitter as NMissC

Missing Posts: If you have a link to a post that's not here or are looking for posts from Summer of 2010, check this page.

BlogRoll

Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker: Against a vote on the jobs bill but for the jobs bill. Got it?

There are much harder gyrations politicians attempt to make– take, for instance, McCain’s current claim that he didn’t realize the Tarp money was going to banks (he said he was mislead by Bush’s secretary of treasury) and that Obama suspended his campaign, too– but the two Mississippi senators are in a small and exclusive club– the six senators who voted against cloture (which is a vote to allow a fillibuster on the jobs bill) but then for the jobs bill.

I suppose this means they were against the jobs bill before they were for it.  I fully expect to learn that there are projects each finds appealing and that they will shortly be back in Mississippi claiming credit for the money they’ve brought home.

Here’s the report from TPM, along with a list of all six (it’s remarkable how close at hand they are– we have a third of them here in Mississippi, plus one next door in Tennessee and another in Arkansas, with the other two not far off in Florida and Oklahoma.  A tight cluster) plus the other two (Hatch of Utah and Burr of North Carolina) who failed to vote on cloture– effectively the same vote– and then voted for the bill.

On Monday, the Senate voted for cloture on the Democratic jobs bill, 62-30. Today, they passed the bill itself in a vote of 70-28.

That means eight senators who voted against cloture (or were absent, which in a cloture vote is the same as a no vote) vote for the bill itself. All of them are Republicans.

The switchers who voted no on cloture but yes today:

Lamar Alexander (R-TN)
Thad Cochran (R-MS)
James Inhofe (R-OK)
George LeMieux (R-FL)
Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)
Roger Wicker (R-MS)

And those who were absent Monday but voted yes today:

Orrin Hatch (R-UT)
Richard Burr (R-NC)

With so many bunched so close, this is a pattern deserving a name.  What can we call this group?  (“blue dogs” is taken, and unless you say “dog” with the appropriate amount of sneer, not scurrilous enough).

Comments are closed.