I am Tom Freeland, a lawyer in Oxford, Mississippi. The picture in the header is my law office. I'm on Twitter as NMissC

Missing Posts: If you have a link to a post that's not here or are looking for posts from Summer of 2010, check this page.

BlogRoll

Did the Square have two-way traffic, part two: a 1933 photograph shows it

This is a photo I found the other day (and that Observer linked in a comment).  It’s taken from the balcony on what was then, I think, a dry goods store (it certainly was a dry goods store in the late-50s early 60s, where I was hoping mom would pick Red Goose shoes [...]

Did the Square have 2 way traffic, part one: The end of The Sound and the Fury Says Yes

In the end of  The Sound and the Fury, Faulkner describes two-way traffic on the Square.  There’s a huge debate occurring on Facebook about whether the Square ever had 2 way traffic.  As I noted, if it did not, the ending of The Sound and the Fury makes no sense.

To set this up:  Luster, a young [...]

Fascinating British Pathe’ video from the Meredith crisis, with interesting stuff in town and on campus

British Pathe’ has put an enormous amount of their material on Youtube just now.  I searched for Mississippi, and one of the first hits was two films about the Meredith crisis.  First is this one, about the moment the riots occurred, with interesting video from the town and campus, plus the moment of crisis [...]

Well, at least Gary Wills thinks that Sen. Sumner ridiculing Sen. Butler’s lisp lead to the caning

After Sen. Charles Sumner made a speech titled “The Crime Against Kansas,” in which he particularly attacked Sen. Douglas and Butler for advocating slavery in Kansas in very personal terms, Butler’s nephew, a congressman, came onto the Senate floor and caned Sumner almost to death.

In comments, ColRebSez made the offhand remark that Sumner [...]

Arthur “Guitar Boogie” Smith gets a New York Times obituary

Last weekend, I wrote about the death of Arthur “Boogie” Smith, a pioneering country music figure, great guitarist, and songwriter.  Today, he got a New York Times obituary.

Country guitarist Arthur “Guitar Boogie” Smith has died

Arthur “Guitar Boogie” Smith has died at 93. Probably his most important recording (as opposed to his most famous) was “Guitar Boogie,” which was close to the first country record with guitars playing straight-up boogie woogie parts.  There’s a nice obituary on the Charlotte Observer site.

He said it was not anything he learned [...]

A Black Student at Ole Miss ponders the Kappa Alpha fraternity’s Old South Ball

In today’s Daily Mississippian, the opinion editor, Tim Abram, meditates on why it would be that his college classmates who are in the Kappa Alpha fraternity might think it’s a good idea to travel to St. Joseph Plantation, where parts of 12 Years a Slave were filmed, to have themselves an Old South Ball, celebrating the “values” of [...]

Be warned: In my experience, the buffalo fish is more bone than meat

But if you want some, this establishment is just inside the Pontotoc County line coming from Tupelo right before Highway 6 becomes two-lane.

 

The Oyster Beds of Pontotoc County

 

Today, I took a kid (as a treat for two weeks great weeks at school) to fossil beds in Pontotoc County that were deposited when this part of the world was part of a Cretaceous period shallow inland sea. Didn’t find much variety this time– all but two finds were oysters, although [...]

A Lovely Bunch of Coconuts

Sarah and Brian went to the Treme to see the Zulu’s parade.

This is what they brought back.