I am Tom Freeland, a lawyer in Oxford, Mississippi. The picture in the header is my law office. I'm on Twitter as NMissC

Missing Posts: If you have a link to a post that's not here or are looking for posts from Summer of 2010, check this page.

BlogRoll

Kingfish reports: the Governor folds, withdraws executive order, and BCBS, victorious, drops suit.

Jackson Jambalaya reports that the Governor has issued a new executive order canceling the order requiring BCBS to reinstate the hospitals.  He reports that BCBS announces it is “pleased.”

And now we’ll never know how the action before Judge Wingate would turn out.

NY Times on KMOX and how the Mississippi River Valley filled up with Cardinals fans

The NY Times has a wonderful story to illustrate how a lot of folks in the Mississippi River Valley became Cardinals fans:  The reporter takes off from St. Louis just before the start of a World Series game there, to see if he can outdrive the stations signal before the game ends.  By game […]

Press reports read the entrails and see things in BCBS ruling mere mortals might miss

Update: Jeff Amy of the AP points out in comments that Judge Wingate made a bench ruling not reflected on the Pacer docket. His story spelled this out (and I should have caught it): “U.S. District Judge Henry T. Wingate read a temporary restraining order from the bench saying Bryant didn’t provide enough proof […]

An element for a TRO is proving likely success. Judge “is not holding that the executive order was legally flawed.” Discuss.

This appeared about 5 on the district court docket.  I have added emphasis in the key passage..

Minute Entry for proceedings held before District Judge Henry T. Wingate. APPEARANCES: D. Kaufman and C. Green, counsel for plaintiff; H. Pizzetta (via telephone) and J. Wilson, counsel for defendant; J. Corlew, counsel for intervenor. Evidentiary Hearing […]

More thoughts on the federal court BCBS case

BCBS has two arguments that seem real to me:  The governor is violating their property rights by telling them they can’t invoke contract rights (to terminate), which is a due process violation; and that the governor is violating their rights to procedural due process by ignoring the whole procedural framework the statute has.

The […]

How often has Ole Miss football scored 59 or more points?

Not often.  The last time we scored 59 or more against a team that wasn’t Louisana-Monroe (who we beat 59-0 in 2008 and 59-14 in 2003) was 1994 against Southern Ill.

Before that:

1980 Memphis St. 61-7

1979 Vandy 63-28

1969 Southern 69-7 (paid for that one the next year, perhaps?).  This was the […]

Tonight, it was wonderful to see both vandalism and obstructionism go down to ignominious defeat.

The Cardinals have been owed a weird umpire call at least since game 6 of the 1985 World Series, right?  (And, sorry Red Sox fans, the way the third baseman kicked up his legs was obstruction. See below).

Here’s the rule and comment:

OBSTRUCTION is the act of a fielder who, while not in […]

On a quick, casual read over the attorney general’s filing in the BCBS case…

Kingfish has the pleadings filed by the insurance commissioner and the attorney general, and notes that after a three hour hearing, Judge Wingate announced he would rule Monday.

… I am struck by how convincingly they make the point that this is really just a dispute about state law and what powers the state […]

Various Reactions to James Franco’s Adaptation of As I Lay Dying

Darl

Darl is clearly a poet and seer of sorts in the book; his monologues are full of rich language, and it becomes clear that he is picking up upon and understanding events that no other character understands.  That’s his role in the book, and, in the end, when he burns down the barn […]

Things-Were-Different-Then Department

“[It] was his way of cooking the squirrels which gained him such popularity and eclat with the ladies,” from a description of James Matthews, inventor of the Brunswick stew, quoted in Robert Moss’s Barbecue: The History of an American Institution.