I am Tom Freeland, a lawyer in Oxford, Mississippi. The picture in the header is my law office. I'm on Twitter as NMissC

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BlogRoll

Eggplants are here, and Brown Family Farm has mozzarella

I’m making a point of cooking local as much as possible, and for a month have pulled that off.  The word that the Browns were doing mozarella, just as eggplants and summer tomatoes were coming in,  made my cooking this weekend.

First, I made a big batch of tomato sauce, based on Marchella Hazan’s […]

They’ve confirmed the Tanguska Event was a meteorite

After years of being unsure, scientists have confirmed what caused the Tanguska Event:

Victor Kvasnytsya from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and his colleagues used the latest imaging and spectroscopy techniques to identify aggregates of carbon minerals—diamond, lonsdaleite, and graphite. Lonsdaleite in particular is known to form when carbon-rich material is suddenly exposed […]

A strange re-writing of the DOMA opinion

Randy Barnett, writing on both the SCOTUSblog and the Volokh Conspiracy blog, has re-tooled the logic of Windsor v. United States in a form that is more pleasing to his desire for federalism cases.  Only, it’s not what the court ruled or said.   He describes his take on the logic of the decision:

[…]

Eric Posner: “Justice Thomas has integrity, but it’s the integrity of a madman.”

Eric Posner’s list of what he learned on the Slate breakfast club reviewing the Supreme Court term is great reading and very funny.   Among the lessons learned:

* Justice Thomas has integrity, but it’s the integrity of a madman. He is the Ron Paul of the Supreme Court.

* The conservative justices really […]

I have the impression these people aren’t getting along, Part 2

It has been widely reported that, while Justice Ginsburg was reading a statement about her dissent in a sexual harassment case on Monday, Justice Alito, right there on the bench, was acting out like a school child.  A badly behaved school child.  The Washington Post describesAlito “visibly mocking” Ginsburg while she read her dissent:

Ginsburg, the […]

I have the impression these people just aren’t getting along.

Did you folks know there were three decisions released by the U.S. Supreme Court today?

Somewhere, an individual named Giridhar C. Sekhar and his lawyers are celebrating a victory on a national stage and no one noticed.

I was vaguely aware another case (Sekhar v. United States) was coming, and somewhere along the line got […]

Judge Posner on the Voting Rights Act case: “There is no doctrine of equal sovereignty. The opinion rests on air.”

Richard Posner is not impressed with either the reasoning or intellectual honesty demonstrated in the Voting Rights Act opinion.

Shelby County v. Holder, decided Tuesday, struck down a key part of the Voting Rights Act (the part requiring certain states with a history of racial discrimination in voting to obtain federal permission in advance […]

CLE in Jackson and Tupelo on loan foreclosures and workouts

Joyce Freeland (my wife, who also practices law with me), J. Douglas Minor, and Phillip Buffington are doing a seminar in Tupelo (on July 17th) and Jackson (on July 18th) titled “Boot Camp:  Foreclosure and Loan Workout Procedures.”  The seminar is sponsored by NBI.

Joyce will be presenting on attachments of rents, lender liability […]

Gay Marriage: Shouldn’t full faith and credit be the next battle?

Question:  What happens when a couple with a valid gay marriage sues a state like Mississippi saying it’s entitled to respect under the Constitution’s requirement of Full Faith and Credit? The clause requires all states give full faith and credit to the “public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state.” Doesn’t that […]

Strange citation of the day: Justice Scalia’s odd invocation of the Confederacy

He writes in the DOMA case:

The majority concludes that the only motive for this Act was the ““bare . . . desire to harm a politically unpopular group.”” Ante, at 20. Bear in mind that the object of this condemnation is not the legislature of some once-Confederate Southern state (familiar objects of the Court’’s scorn, see, e.g., Edwards v. Aguillard, 482 U.S. 578 (1987)), but our respected coordinate branches, the Con- gress and Presidency of the United States.

Quick! What was Edwards about?  How did it show “scorn” to a “once-Confederate Southern state?  Which state?  How did Scalia vote?

Answers await below the fold.

Oh, and I’m almost a winner on the scavenger hunt he proposes in Windsor (yes, he really does propose a scavenger hunt).

Continue reading Strange citation of the day: Justice Scalia’s odd invocation of the Confederacy